Politics of Star Trek

I thought these articles by Andrew Price might interest the readers of my journal:

Conservatives often talk about what they don’t like about Hollywood. That’s okay, but it’s not productive. Maybe it’s time we talked about what we do like? More to the point, let’s point out when Hollywood has gotten it right. And that brings me to the original “Star Trek” series.

I’m not saying the creators of “Star Trek” were conservatives; they weren’t. But liberalism has shifting values, and for a brief period at the end of the 1960s, liberalism temporarily overlapped with the values of classical liberalism, which is the foundation of modern conservatism. “Star Trek” benefited from this. In fact, I think you’ll be surprised how deeply conservative these shows are.

The Nazi Episode:

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Hollywood/2012/02/11/the-politics-of-star-trek-patterns-of-force

The Hamlet Episode:

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Hollywood/2012/03/30/politics-star-trek-conscience-king

The Viet Nam War Episode:

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Hollywood/2012/06/02/Politics-of-Star-Trek

11 Comments

  1. Comment by Zach:

    This is just one of the reasons Kirk is better than Picard.

    • Comment by joetexx:

      To say nothing of actual hair.

    • Comment by robertjwizard:

      There was a documentary a few years ago that did statistics on the Enterprise captains. From memory, the category of fist fights was all other captains 10 or 11 out of 100+ shows, Captain Kirk was something like 92 fist fights for 79 episodes. I think even the pillar of reason himself, Mr. Spock, defended himself with his fists more than the other captains.

      I only saw the original Star Trek and some of NTG. NTG always struck me as fitting the PC Clinton 90′s to a tee. The men were emasculated, there was the garbage how they had risen above the petty need for money. Picard was just dry – get out there and fight! Endless negotiating and blabbering. Kirk would have drawn his guns about 25 minutes earlier in every episode.

    • Comment by distributistatlarge:

      I liked TNG and DS9.

      The idea behind all the Star Treks- including TOS, but it wasn’t talked about much- was that some new choice between capitalism and socialism had been invented. I have no idea how the actual economic system worked but I wish could live in the Federation. Free health care, food, lodging? Freedom to work at what I want? Sign me up and point me to the space station design tutorials!

      Voyager and Enterprise were the worst in terms of PC crap. I stopped watching Voyager after the thinly disguised anti-hiroshima bombing episode. Most episodes of Enterprise are just boring. I fall asleep.

  2. Comment by bear545:

    TNG was a bit schizophrenic to me. On the one hand, the usual drivel you point out- no more money, no hunger, etc. (I remember well the captain of DS9 complaining about how the paradise on earth was actually a handicap for the federation) On the other hand, it was like a corporate venture into space. They were constantly having board meetings. Even during the crisis when the ship was disabled and Deanna was in charge, with only three survivors on the bridge, they leave the bridge for he meeting room so the three can discuss their options. Plus, the only value ever expressed throughout the show was the value of a career. The worst possible thing that could happen to anyone was that their career could be hurt. Careers were so important that, during the Borg crisis, Picard took Riker aside to discuss Riker’s career. Socialist paradise within a 90′s corporate structure- the worst of both worlds.

  3. Comment by Foxfier:

    Star Trek’s philosophy was liberal– it just took second place to really good stories and a lot of western story tropes, which meant that if you look too close it’s crazy.

    The lack of religious stuff is what freaks me out… DS9 was my favorite, but the more I think about the parts of all the shows that I’ve seen as a whole, the more I think religion’s been driven underground.

    Eeek! He has the “absolute power” quote! Aaaargh! He was talking about power corrupting the judgement about what someone had done, rather than of power making people go bad. More worried about justice than justification.

  4. Comment by Foxfier:

    Per my dear husband:
    He loves Q, because Q is what happens when you give a liberal ultimate power. Thus, he’s a parable.

    Me? Can’t stand the blanking blanker…. Even in his My Little Pony incarnation, which is what brought it up. (Discord can bite my fanny.)

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