Good News for Geeks

From the NY Times:

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt announced on Sunday that it had acquired the United States rights to publish a previously unknown work by J. R. R. Tolkien, “The Fall of Arthur.” The book, set for publication in May, chronicles the last days of King Arthur and will be edited by Tolkien’s son Christopher, who will also provide commentary and notes. Tolkien, the author of “The Lord of the Rings,” died in 1973. This is the first new work by him to be unearthed since “The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun” was released in 2009.

3 Comments

  1. Comment by Manwe King of the Valar:

    Oh.My.God.
    Where do I pre-order?!
    Tolkien, the god of fantasy….on Arthur, the king of legends?!?! How on earth can anyone not want this?!

    *Geek zeal lessening….rational mind retaking control*
    Phew, almost lost it there ;)

    Can I just say, thank you for pointing this out Mr. Wright! I probably would have missed this news in totality, and finally found out about it only two weeks before it launched. So, thanks for the notice! :)

    I like how they keep finding this stuff all these years later, it’s like Tolkien never truly died! Though I do wonder what will happen once Christopher Tolkien dies…who will edit the newly found works then?

  2. Comment by Suburbanbanshee:

    It occurs to me that Tolkien, Heaney, and that Indian guy who writes poem novels are the only ones who are having long-form poetry published these days.

  3. Comment by Sean Michael:

    Dear Mr. Wright:

    I was indeed interested in this bit of news about the publication of Tolkien’s Arthurian poem. I’ll be very glad to purchase a copy. I read about this unpublished work in Humphrey Carpenter’s biography of JRRT (pages 168-69 of the hard back edition).

    What interests me is whether or not Tolkien completed the poem. Carpenter wrote that Tolkien never completed it. Perhaps Christopher Tolkien found different parts of the poem scattered among his father’s papers and was able to put them together?

    Sincerely, Sean M. Brooks

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